Disney Turns Over a New Stone

Disney Interactive has released a new web series based on the iconic Disney Parks attraction It’s a Small World, in partnership with the language learning system Rosetta Stone.

Designed to heighten kids' knowledge of places and cultures around the world while giving them early exposure to foreign language skills, the first episode of “It's a Small World: The Animated Series” premiered Tuesday on Disney.com, Disney's YouTube network and across Disney's connected TV apps.

The original series is sponsored by Rosetta Stone Kids’ new “Lingo Word Builder” app, marking the company’s continued movement toward the kids' education and entertainment market.

"At Disney Interactive, we're constantly looking for new ways to bring fans closer to the Disney characters and stories they love. With ‘It's a Small World: The Animated Series,’ we're leveraging the interactive medium to bring a classic Disney experience to life for a whole new generation," says Mark Walker, senior vice president, Disney Interactive Entertainment.

The animated series consists of eight episodes that follow a group of children from different countries as they cross the globe to explore new lands. The animation is inspired by artist Mary Blair's original designs for the theme park ride and features original music from Richard Sherman, the Disney composer of the attraction's theme song, "It's a Small World (After All)."

"No one speaks the language of children better than Disney, and no one teaches language better than Rosetta Stone, so this partnership is a natural fit," says Prag Shah, president of global consumer markets, Rosetta Stone. "We couldn't be more excited to join forces with the iconic Disney brand to provide children with the ultimate experience in multicultural awareness and language-learning."

A special language-learning segment called “Words with Wazoh” will follow each episode. Additionally, “It's a Small World: The Animated Series” will feature a Rosetta Stone-branded episode that follows a journey to the British Museum to discover the importance of the actual Egyptian Rosetta Stone tablet. 

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